What is the purpose of the chronicle of higher education?

chronicle of higher education

The Chronicle of Higher Education is a source of news, opinion, advice, and jobs for people in higher education. It covers topics such as academic affairs, faculty, student life, administration, technology, teaching and learning, and career development. It also publishes data and analysis on salaries, enrollment, graduation rates, rankings, and other aspects of higher education. The Chronicle of Higher Education aims to inform and inspire its readers with high-quality journalism and insights from experts and practitioners.

What is the history of the Chronicle of Higher Education?

According to the web search results and the question-answering results, the history of The Chronicle of Higher Education is as follows:

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education was officially founded in 1966 by Corbin Gwaltney and its first issue was launched in November 1966.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education was originally a project of Editorial Projects in Education (EPE), a nonprofit organization that also published Education Week. EPE was founded in 1957 by Gwaltney, who was then the editor of the alumni magazine at Johns Hopkins University. EPE produced a series of reports on higher education called the Moonshooter Reports. Which were distributed to college magazines across the country.
  • In 1978, EPE sold The Chronicle to Jack Crowl and Gwaltney, who formed The Chronicle of Higher Education Inc. Gwaltney bought the entire company in 1990, and until his death in July 2019, was co-chair of its board of directors, along with his wife and current chair, Pamela Gwaltney.
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education has grown to become the nation’s largest newsroom dedicated to covering colleges and universities. It publishes news, opinion, advice, and jobs for higher education professionals online every weekday and in print weekly. It also publishes The Chronicle Review, a magazine of arts and ideas, and Arts & Letters Daily, a website that curates articles on culture and ideas.

How has The Chronicle of Higher Education evolved over time?

The Chronicle of Higher Education has evolved over time in several ways, such as:

  • It expanded its scope from a supplement on higher education issues for college magazines to a newspaper and website that presents news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and student affairs professionals, including staff members and administrators.
  • It diversified its content from news and opinion to include advice, data, analysis, rankings, and other aspects of higher education. It also launched The Chronicle Review, a magazine of arts and ideas, and Arts & Letters Daily, a website that curates articles on culture and ideas.
  • It adapted to the changing media landscape by increasing its online presence and offering digital subscriptions. It also made its website more user-friendly and interactive, with features such as blogs, podcasts, videos, newsletters, forums, webinars, and social media.
  • It responded to the growing demand for diversity, equity, and inclusion in higher education by covering topics such as race, gender, sexuality, disability, class, religion, and culture. It also created special reports and sections on minority-serving institutions, international education, and global issues.

What are some current issues in higher education?

Some current issues in higher education are:

  1. The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the ensuing economic crisis on the accessibility, quality, and sustainability of higher education. The pandemic has forced many institutions to shift to online or hybrid modes of teaching and learning, which pose challenges for faculty, students, and administrators. The economic downturn has also reduced the revenues and resources of many colleges and universities, leading to budget cuts, layoffs, furloughs, and closures. 
  2. The need for reform and innovation in higher education to address the changing needs and expectations of students, employers, and society. Higher education needs to move towards active learning, teaching skills that will endure in a changing world, and adopting formative assessment. Higher education also needs to embrace diversity, equity, and inclusion in its policies, practices, and curricula, and to respond to the global issues and challenges of the 21st century.  
  3. The influence of political interference and privatization on higher education. Some politicians have tried to impose their ideological agendas on higher education. Such as banning critical race theory, censoring academic freedom, and undermining shared governance. Some private corporations have also sought to profit from higher education. Such as online program managers (OPMs) that offer low-quality online courses and degrees for high fees. These trends threaten the integrity, autonomy, and public mission of higher education.

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